The demand for smartphones continued to grow at an astounding 42% in the past year, according to IDC’s Worldwide Mobile Phone Tracker, with 154 million units shipped worldwide in Q2 2012.   Not surprisingly, the corporate world is increasingly seeing the value of the mobile platform for delivery of their business systems and for communication with their clients. Recently we have seen an increasing number of tenders across Australia requiring mobile delivery as either the main platform or at least an important component.

Spatial Vision has had extensive experience in building mobile apps using smart phones and tablets. We would like to share our experience with you. ‘Navigating the Mobile Maze’ is the latest in our popular series of Under-the-Hood workshops.

We have successfully run various workshops to share and demonstrate our findings including the ‘Navigating the Mobile Maze’ workshop last November that received positive feedback.

Report from the Association for Geographic Information (AGI) GeoCommunity '11 conference in Nottingham, UK

So you know what GIS (Geographic Information System) and CAD (Computer Aided Design) stand for, what about BIM? It was new to me. Building information modelling is defined as the process of generating and managing building data during its life cycle. The Building Information Models encompass building geometry and quantities and properties of building components. Pieces can carry attributes for selecting and ordering them automatically, providing cost estimates and well as material tracking and ordering (Wikipedia 2011).

If you are into mapping emergencies, you will be interested to know that the Canadians have developed a national approach to Emergency Management Symbology (EMS)*.

The EMS is designed to be used by individual and multi-agency emergency mapping applications to facilitate interoperability and situational awareness.

Successful emergency response often starts with a map. The question of “where” is fundamental to instigating an effective response to an incident, the deployment of resources, the assessment of risks and the safety of the community. The symbols used to represent the location and type of incident or resources are critical to communication. The more recognizable the symbol, the faster its interpretation and the ability to make decisions based on it.  Critically, there may be dire consequences if symbols are misinterpreted.

Madison, the capital of Wisconsin, was the site for the North American Cartographic Information Society (NACIS http://bit.ly/10FIw6) annual conference for 2011. Madison is home to the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus, home of some of the great cartographers and geographers of the 20th century http://bit.ly/8Y3Szd , such as Arthur Robinson and Yi-Fu Tuan http://bit.ly/92NX3u. One of the great experiences of the conference was the closing address at the banquet by Yi-Fu Tuan "On the Relationship Between Cartography and Humanism". His talk covered topics as diverse as representations of cities on medieval maps and landscapes in Chinese art, to our sense of place when one feels homesick.

How does design makes a difference?

The NACIS (North American Cartographic Information Society) conference 2011 is being held in Madison, Wisconsin, a beautiful city situated between lakes Mendota and Monona. The first day of the conference kicked off with a Practical Cartography Day, which consisted of 13 speakers presenting short presentations about matters as diverse as working with LIDAR to thematic cartography using Javascript.

Recently Spatial Vision's Application Services Division have been busy developing ICE (Integrated Catch & Effort) system for Fisheries Victoria. A large part of the ICE application revolves around operators entering data from paper forms which record the fish caught by each commercial fisher on a trip. This enables Fisheries Victoria to monitor fish stocks. Getting the data entry part of the application right was absolutely essential. Even small insufficiencies would add up, leading to hours wasted and endless frustration.

When the signs on the freeway and at train stations are directing you to a conference, then it must be big, and Intergeo certainly is. Intergeo is billed as the world’s biggest trade fair for geodesy, geoinformation and land management and is the premier geospatial conference for Germany. There were over 500 exhibitors at the trade show with over 17,500 visitors. Now that’s big. In addition, 1,500 people attended the conference.

I came to see what 500 exhibitors of geospatial related services and technologies would look like and was impressed by the variety of offerings. There were three themes that stood out to me: 3D visualisation, data collection vehicles and open GIS.

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