Have you ever considered all the ways we use geography on a daily basis? I thought I would use a mind map to create a picture of my geographic relationships…

You can easily see that everything we do and everything around us is located somewhere and connected by geography. To take that one step further, how do you harness that information? Geospatial intelligence is derived from understanding the geographic relationships between things.

So here comes the company pitch, Spatial Vision helps customers create and utilise geospatial intelligence in their decisions. Hope you enjoy the video.

I attended the above event last night – it was my first time. I was worried. The forecast temperature was concerning. I was unsure what to expect. It did not start well – once your attendance had been marked off and you received a beanie and drink bottle, then you line up for a photo. Then you are issued with your cardboard (and not special heat insulating cardboard – just plain thin cardboard!) and advised to set up camp somewhere along the concourse of Etihad Stadium).

Call triple zero; you expect the ambulance to get there promptly. Move into a new house; you expect to be able to get connected to gas and electricity etc. Many vital life transactions depend on reliable geospatial data for property addresses. In Victoria, the custodian for provision of most address data is your local government.

Many local councils currently face challenges maintaining this and other geospatial data, often due to easily preventable organisational issues. A key flaw with many councils’ is the lack of appreciation of the importance of geospatial data among the organisation’s upper tiers.

Given up on strategic plans because no one pays them any attention?
Can’t get the decision makers to read them, let alone fund them?

Too often I see strategic plans that describe implementing lots of technology but fail to demonstrate successfully how they will benefit the organisation or customers.

Effective strategic plans lay out a vision and a common set of organisational goals (describing how to get there and measure progress along the way). If the plan is going to be successful, it needs to be accepted across an organisation: people need to understand what the plan will deliver and how it is to be achieved.

Previously I've posted about TileMill and how much I've enjoyed using it and how impressed I am with its cartographic results. Since then I've been delving deeper into creating topographic maps from locally sourced data, and trying to replicate map designs that have been created in Adobe Illustrator and porting them to TileMill. Now this hasn't been a simple process and has taken much gnashing of teeth and pulling of hair to get the TileMill designs to as close as possible replicate the Illustrator design. 

Most people look at a map as merely a tool, an instrument of information which they can use to gain a better understanding about the world around them.

However, in reality maps are much more than that; maps are a unique combination of art and science, bringing together beauty and colour with fact and detail.

 

Anyone can sketch out a rough outline of a map, but it takes true talent and determination to create a map that is both factually accurate and beautiful to look at - this is where a custom cartographic service comes in.

TileMill is fast gaining traction in the web mapping community as the tool of choice, not just because it is a free and open-source alternative, but because it can create stunning multi-scale seamless maps and offers you an affordable hosting alternative to Google and Amazon.

Follow this link to discover more about the process of designing and producing web maps using TileMill.

Many years ago I had an idea to create a map without lines, polygons or symbols…just using purely text. I could never quite get it to work effectively; however with modern illustration software and GIS data, the workflow has became much simpler.

Typographic maps have become quite popular at present. There are some excellent examples by some well known cartographers and artists, such as Axis maps, Paula Scher maps, Ursula Hitz, Stephen Walter and Golden Section Graphics, to name but a few.

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