If you have ever seen Robert Hoddle's 1837 survey of the town of Melbourne, you instantly recognise the genius of Murray Walker’s tapestry, Melbourne. The huge tapestry hanging in the foyer of Bourke Place captures the grid plan for Melbourne as drawn up by the Surveyor Hoddle. The tapestry also includes the original topographic features of Batman Hill, the natural alignment of the Yarra River and the surrounding tea tree scrub as drawn by Hoddle on the map. The tapestry details include the ink spills that you can also see on the original. If you love maps, you will be delighted to see this work.

Every year around June, Apple holds a conference in San Francisco called the World Wide Developers Conference. I have wanted to go to this conference since starting to develop for Apple platforms back when I was at University

Getting to meet the engineers who make the platforms I work on and being one of the first learn about all the new technologies is something that I hoped to get the chance to do some day. This year I got that chance.

On the 8th of June I left Melbourne for sunny California. I hadn’t been on an overseas trip in a really long time so it was a great adventure for me.

The demand for smartphones continued to grow at an astounding 42% in the past year, according to IDC’s Worldwide Mobile Phone Tracker, with 154 million units shipped worldwide in Q2 2012.   Not surprisingly, the corporate world is increasingly seeing the value of the mobile platform for delivery of their business systems and for communication with their clients. Recently we have seen an increasing number of tenders across Australia requiring mobile delivery as either the main platform or at least an important component.

Spatial Vision has had extensive experience in building mobile apps using smart phones and tablets. We would like to share our experience with you. ‘Navigating the Mobile Maze’ is the latest in our popular series of Under-the-Hood workshops.

We have successfully run various workshops to share and demonstrate our findings including the ‘Navigating the Mobile Maze’ workshop last November that received positive feedback.

Report from the Association for Geographic Information (AGI) GeoCommunity '11 conference in Nottingham, UK

So you know what GIS (Geographic Information System) and CAD (Computer Aided Design) stand for, what about BIM? It was new to me. Building information modelling is defined as the process of generating and managing building data during its life cycle. The Building Information Models encompass building geometry and quantities and properties of building components. Pieces can carry attributes for selecting and ordering them automatically, providing cost estimates and well as material tracking and ordering (Wikipedia 2011).

If you are into mapping emergencies, you will be interested to know that the Canadians have developed a national approach to Emergency Management Symbology (EMS)*.

The EMS is designed to be used by individual and multi-agency emergency mapping applications to facilitate interoperability and situational awareness.

Successful emergency response often starts with a map. The question of “where” is fundamental to instigating an effective response to an incident, the deployment of resources, the assessment of risks and the safety of the community. The symbols used to represent the location and type of incident or resources are critical to communication. The more recognizable the symbol, the faster its interpretation and the ability to make decisions based on it.  Critically, there may be dire consequences if symbols are misinterpreted.

Madison, the capital of Wisconsin, was the site for the North American Cartographic Information Society (NACIS http://bit.ly/10FIw6) annual conference for 2011. Madison is home to the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus, home of some of the great cartographers and geographers of the 20th century http://bit.ly/8Y3Szd , such as Arthur Robinson and Yi-Fu Tuan http://bit.ly/92NX3u. One of the great experiences of the conference was the closing address at the banquet by Yi-Fu Tuan "On the Relationship Between Cartography and Humanism". His talk covered topics as diverse as representations of cities on medieval maps and landscapes in Chinese art, to our sense of place when one feels homesick.

How does design makes a difference?

The NACIS (North American Cartographic Information Society) conference 2011 is being held in Madison, Wisconsin, a beautiful city situated between lakes Mendota and Monona. The first day of the conference kicked off with a Practical Cartography Day, which consisted of 13 speakers presenting short presentations about matters as diverse as working with LIDAR to thematic cartography using Javascript.

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