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Safeguarding humpbacks whales against migratory interference. Shutting down illegal trash dumping through the identification of problem areas. Interactive biodiversity education tools for Victoria’s classrooms.

These diverse problems are all being addressed through mobile applications developed by Spatial Vision and key stakeholders that rely on one of the greatest untapped resources of the modern day: crowdsourced data. With nearly every Australian owning a mobile phone, the possibilities for cooperation between citizens and stakeholders are enormous, as demonstrated in a presentation by Katie Dick, one of our senior analysts at the Locate16 conference.

Katie Dick presented at Locate16 on a somewhat bleak, yet current topic.

Today, violence against women is the biggest contributor to ill health and premature death in women aged 15–44*. A subsequent result of violence can be the onset of mental illness, such as anxiety and depression.

You would think that there are no excuse for people getting lost these days with smart phones, GPS and map apps, but they do.
Doug Incoll, the Alpine Cluster Commander, stationed at Bright Police can tell many stories of people getting lost and needing assistance too often because they weren’t prepared. The high country around Bright is very beautiful but can turn deadly very quickly at any time of year.

In February this year, data nerds across Australia were waiting with bated breath for the greatly anticipated release of the PSMA’s G-NAF dataset. At last: the multi-sourced, multifaceted, Australia wide collection of geocoded addresses was going to be free and open for everyone.

Introducing the latest advancement which seamlessly connects your business to the cloud.

As a graduate, new things fly across your desk daily, mostly met with a wary smile belying an inner voice yelling “what is that?!” At Spatial Vision being a graduate provides countless opportunities to invariably splash your imagination against the canvas of the burgeoning geospatial industry. None more so than the graduate cadetship project. An opportunity to take 120 hours and dive down the rabbit hole. Which is why when performing daily tasks your mind can afford to answer that little question with the intrigue it deserves.

The plugin contains a simple tool to add noise to spatial data for the purposes of maintaining “geo-indistinguishability”, i.e. an individual’s true location shouldn’t be able to be determined by the location of the point, but it should be accurate enough to make a useful study of the data. This is done by computing a random number from a 2d laplacian distribution and migrating the origin point by this much. It’s an implementation of the algorithm implemented in [1], and inspired / based on the implementation in the location-guard browser extension.

There are many definitions of Smart Cities and examples of what they can achieve. However, it would appear that there is no cogent model or framework to define them let alone measure their success. That being said, Marc Jadoul from Alcatel Lucent has laid out four steps to build Smarter Cities in a recent presentation: 

1. Networked infrastructure
2. Big data and open data
3. Smart public services
4. Citizen applications

Not surprisingly, a network communications platform is the foundation for the plan. Jadoul was very complimentary on Australia’s investment in the National broadband Network (NBN) that will assist to establish high speed connectivity across the country.

The second step is about data and governance. Data comes in many forms and sources. Jadoul reckons that ‘big data’ is the oil of the 21st century. With already more things connected to the internet than people on our planet, the Internet of Things (IoT) is creating a wealth of (big) data to be tapped. Our smart phones and cars are already generating legions of dynamic data from multiple sensors. Combined with sensors tied to all sorts of assets such street lights, CCTV cameras, shipping containers and even connected coffee pots our cup runneth over.


Spatial Vision is the exclusive reseller of the GIS Cloud SaaS applications. This recently held webinar walks you through some of the main features of GIS Cloud, including the Map Editor and Mobile Data Collection app for mobile devices.

For further information contact us directly on 03 9691 3000.


 Introducing GIS Cloud webinar

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