Spatial Vision is the exclusive reseller of the GIS Cloud SaaS applications. This recently held webinar walks you through some of the main features of GIS Cloud, including the Map Editor and Mobile Data Collection app for mobile devices.

For further information contact us directly on 03 9691 3000.

 Introducing GIS Cloud webinar

Federal and State elections bring into focus a broad range of issues, some or many of which are very important to us.   Ultimately, it is the balancing of these issues and judgements about the various visions, priorities and programs on offer that determines how we vote.

Many of the promises offered up by the different parties can be presented in map form.   Using interactive map tools, new spatial technology is allowing voters to engage and better understand issues than ever before.  Spatial Vision’s is a good example of such an approach.  This site shows how social and political issues that emerged in the lead up to last year’s Victorian State Election could be visualised in the form of interactive maps.

There are billions of things connected to the internet. Your phone, watch, running shoes, home and work computer may be all connected. More broadly, water, electrical and telco assets, delivery vehicles, council garbage trucks, red light cameras, weather stations now or in the future will be a node on the net. Collectively this combined network, the biggest humankind constructed network is called the Internet of Things.

A problem that arises often when utilising GIS data is the way labels are rendered on the map, particularly labels that contain more than one word. Take for instance a place name such as Koo wee rup (in Victoria). Some GIS applications allow you to stack labels (place words on top of each other) to condense multi-word labels so that they better indicate the location of the place. This is a useful feature, but place names made up of three or four words can look odd when stacked, particularly if they are made up of short words, say three characters or less.

Have you ever considered all the ways we use geography on a daily basis? I thought I would use a mind map to create a picture of my geographic relationships…

You can easily see that everything we do and everything around us is located somewhere and connected by geography. To take that one step further, how do you harness that information? Geospatial intelligence is derived from understanding the geographic relationships between things.

So here comes the company pitch, Spatial Vision helps customers create and utilise geospatial intelligence in their decisions. Hope you enjoy the video.

I attended the above event last night – it was my first time. I was worried. The forecast temperature was concerning. I was unsure what to expect. It did not start well – once your attendance had been marked off and you received a beanie and drink bottle, then you line up for a photo. Then you are issued with your cardboard (and not special heat insulating cardboard – just plain thin cardboard!) and advised to set up camp somewhere along the concourse of Etihad Stadium).

Call triple zero; you expect the ambulance to get there promptly. Move into a new house; you expect to be able to get connected to gas and electricity etc. Many vital life transactions depend on reliable geospatial data for property addresses. In Victoria, the custodian for provision of most address data is your local government.

Many local councils currently face challenges maintaining this and other geospatial data, often due to easily preventable organisational issues. A key flaw with many councils’ is the lack of appreciation of the importance of geospatial data among the organisation’s upper tiers.

Given up on strategic plans because no one pays them any attention?
Can’t get the decision makers to read them, let alone fund them?

Too often I see strategic plans that describe implementing lots of technology but fail to demonstrate successfully how they will benefit the organisation or customers.

Effective strategic plans lay out a vision and a common set of organisational goals (describing how to get there and measure progress along the way). If the plan is going to be successful, it needs to be accepted across an organisation: people need to understand what the plan will deliver and how it is to be achieved.

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