Generating complex gazetteer indexes is the bane of cartographers. Before the advent of computers, this was an entirely manual process. With the development of geographic information systems and relational databases, the process has been automated somewhat, though in spite of this automation process, errors can still creep in.

Creating a good map is essential when it comes to getting an important message across to an intended audience, but have you ever thought that the conclusions you draw from the information on the map could be unintentionally biased? Maps are not only key tools for spatially displaying trends in data and changes over time; they can also be quite influential in how you interpret the information, depending on what message the creator wants to portray.

Spatial Vision proudly publicly declared their support for marriage equality in Australia.  Spatial Vision is as an organisation that values diversity, human rights and a fair and respectful environment for all.  The mood for change in Australia is definitely evident and it is important that, whichever side of the debate you sit on, you participate in the postal survey. After all, the survey is costing tax payers $122 million.

Recently, a client commissioned us to map a web map of Australia to distribute in China. Specifically, the use case called for a web map of Australia with Chinese language labels, so that Chinese native-speakers could easily interact with the map of Australia in their own language. Both states and capital cities needed labels, and of course the more readable the cartography underneath – the better.

Last week I attended the HIC Conference in Brisbane. This conference was run by the Health Informatics Society of Australia (HISA) and highlighted innovation and the digital transformation of the healthcare sector. There was a focus on the central role that information and health informatics brings in connecting the health care system, being smart with data, and enhancing practitioner and consumer experience in healthcare interactions.

When we come to depict any spatial data in GIS, from physical assets and locations to real-world events and trends, there are two differing systems to display data; Raster and Vector representations.  Both of these methods present data in their own format, with their own advantages and disadvantages.

What a time to be a user or developer of GIS! To re-use an overused, but no less true turn of phrase, we’re seeing the ‘democratisation’ of spatial data (does it help I imagined saying that through gritted teeth?). Data is being made freely and widely available, but also key to the success of this is how we access, consume and exploit it.

In May this year I had the opportunity to visit the offices of RMSI Limited in Noida India. Spatial Vision has worked on a number of projects with RMSI where RMSI has provided the data collection effort and SV has played a QA role.

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