Spatial Analytics and Mapping

Spatial Analytics and Mapping (9)

Spatial analytics provide powerful tools to model and analyse spatial data enabling relationships and trends to be identified that would not otherwise be apparent. Spatial analytics help organisations exploit the power of GIS for applications such as determining land-use suitability, preparing cost-benefit analysis, optimising resource allocation or targeting specific user groups or customers.

We have created the Python Insights blog series to help other Python users by providing solutions to common problems and handy hints.

Programming or scripting is used to make this attribution into a very usable, visually pleasing product. We have created the Python Insights blog series to help other Python users by providing solutions to common problems and handy hints.

How can programming be used in mapping? These days, maps just aren’t made up of lines and areas on a page. They are made up of very rich complex data. Each line can have a myriad of attribution detailing type of feature, use, width and more.

Vector tiles are fast being adopted as the preferred option in viewing and transferring geographic data in desktop GIS and web mapping applications.  But, what are vector tiles and how do they differentiate from other approaches to presenting large collections of geographic data?

Recently, a client commissioned us to map a web map of Australia to distribute in China. Specifically, the use case called for a web map of Australia with Chinese language labels, so that Chinese native-speakers could easily interact with the map of Australia in their own language. Both states and capital cities needed labels, and of course the more readable the cartography underneath – the better.

When we come to depict any spatial data in GIS, from physical assets and locations to real-world events and trends, there are two differing systems to display data; Raster and Vector representations.  Both of these methods present data in their own format, with their own advantages and disadvantages.

The first data from the 2016 Census has just been released so it's important to take time to understand the different geographies used by Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) and what data is being released for each of them.

Call triple zero; you expect the ambulance to get there promptly. Move into a new house; you expect to be able to get connected to gas and electricity etc. Many vital life transactions depend on reliable geospatial data for property addresses. In Victoria, the custodian for provision of most address data is your local government.

Many local councils currently face challenges maintaining this and other geospatial data, often due to easily preventable organisational issues. A key flaw with many councils’ is the lack of appreciation of the importance of geospatial data among the organisation’s upper tiers.

If you are into mapping emergencies, you will be interested to know that the Canadians have developed a national approach to Emergency Management Symbology (EMS)*.

The EMS is designed to be used by individual and multi-agency emergency mapping applications to facilitate interoperability and situational awareness.

Successful emergency response often starts with a map. The question of “where” is fundamental to instigating an effective response to an incident, the deployment of resources, the assessment of risks and the safety of the community. The symbols used to represent the location and type of incident or resources are critical to communication. The more recognizable the symbol, the faster its interpretation and the ability to make decisions based on it.  Critically, there may be dire consequences if symbols are misinterpreted.

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