Spatial Information

Spatial Information (5)

Data held by businesses and government has a spatial component, understanding this spatial component of your data enables you to identify where things are, how they relate and how they can be improved.

Spatial Vision helps clients realise the potential of their data. We provide a service which converts data into digital information which allows you to understand complex spatial relationships at a glance.

As part of my Cadetship at Spatial Vision, I designed and delivered an R&D project. After plenty of research, I chose to explore KNIME’s functionality, and how it can be applied within Spatial Vision. KNIME is a workflow based data transformation, analysis and deployment program.  Developed in Java using Eclipse as a free open source program, users are able to modify the base code of the program to suite their individual needs, allowing the creation of plugins to expand the functionality of KNIME. 

Creating a good map is essential when it comes to getting an important message across to an intended audience, but have you ever thought that the conclusions you draw from the information on the map could be unintentionally biased? Maps are not only key tools for spatially displaying trends in data and changes over time; they can also be quite influential in how you interpret the information, depending on what message the creator wants to portray.

Spatial Vision recently completed a project for the Electoral Commission of Queensland preparing a series of maps for new electoral district boundaries.  As well as the maps, there was a legislative requirement that ‘metes and bounds’ boundary descriptions be prepared for the new boundaries for publication in the Queensland Government Gazette .

A recent article in the Sunday Age titled “What lurks beneath? Victoria’s toxic challenge” highlighted a number of issues regarding the difficulties associated with identifying contaminated sites in Victoria. The same issues are associated with other Australian states.

In 2002, Spatial Vision completed the first GIS Benchmark Survey of Water Authorities in Victoria. Spatial Vision has since followed this up with national surveys in 2006 and 2009. The purpose for the surveys is to enable each authority to benchmark their operational deployment of this technology against their industry counterparts.

Water authorities first started using GIS or spatial information technologies in the early 1980s. However, as evident by Google Earth, the technology has rapidly evolved in recent years and become far more accessible. By 2009, 100% of authorities surveyed operated web-based spatial systems available enterprise-wide, a huge shift from 40% in 2002.

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