Enterprise Spatial

Enterprise Spatial (4)

We can assist you in getting the most out of your GIS infrastructure through architecture design and optimisation. We build databases, servers, and web and desktop applications using proprietary and open source software based on your requirements for cost, accessibility and maintainability.

Our expertise encompasses ESRI, Geocortex, Python, OpenGeo, QGIS and GIS Cloud technologies.

What a time to be a user or developer of GIS! To re-use an overused, but no less true turn of phrase, we’re seeing the ‘democratisation’ of spatial data (does it help I imagined saying that through gritted teeth?). Data is being made freely and widely available, but also key to the success of this is how we access, consume and exploit it.

Introducing the latest advancement which seamlessly connects your business to the cloud.

As a graduate, new things fly across your desk daily, mostly met with a wary smile belying an inner voice yelling “what is that?!” At Spatial Vision being a graduate provides countless opportunities to invariably splash your imagination against the canvas of the burgeoning geospatial industry. None more so than the graduate cadetship project. An opportunity to take 120 hours and dive down the rabbit hole. Which is why when performing daily tasks your mind can afford to answer that little question with the intrigue it deserves.

There are many definitions of Smart Cities and examples of what they can achieve. However, it would appear that there is no cogent model or framework to define them let alone measure their success. That being said, Marc Jadoul from Alcatel Lucent has laid out four steps to build Smarter Cities in a recent presentation: 

1. Networked infrastructure
2. Big data and open data
3. Smart public services
4. Citizen applications

Not surprisingly, a network communications platform is the foundation for the plan. Jadoul was very complimentary on Australia’s investment in the National broadband Network (NBN) that will assist to establish high speed connectivity across the country.

The second step is about data and governance. Data comes in many forms and sources. Jadoul reckons that ‘big data’ is the oil of the 21st century. With already more things connected to the internet than people on our planet, the Internet of Things (IoT) is creating a wealth of (big) data to be tapped. Our smart phones and cars are already generating legions of dynamic data from multiple sensors. Combined with sensors tied to all sorts of assets such street lights, CCTV cameras, shipping containers and even connected coffee pots our cup runneth over.

Report from the Association for Geographic Information (AGI) GeoCommunity '11 conference in Nottingham, UK

So you know what GIS (Geographic Information System) and CAD (Computer Aided Design) stand for, what about BIM? It was new to me. Building information modelling is defined as the process of generating and managing building data during its life cycle. The Building Information Models encompass building geometry and quantities and properties of building components. Pieces can carry attributes for selecting and ordering them automatically, providing cost estimates and well as material tracking and ordering (Wikipedia 2011).

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