Spatial Vision’s extensive range of Outdoor Recreation Guides cover fourteen distinct bushwalking regions throughout Victoria and New South Wales. Each guide contains their own standalone coloured cover, making it easily accessible and identifiable.

As someone working in both the spatial analysis industry as well as software development, I am impressed when coming across tools that can be used for company to analyse performance. Having spent time with fully fledged GIS software and also having an understanding of the statistics useful for analysing the production of a business from my software testing background I was immediately drawn to the capabilities that lie behind ESRIs operation dashboard.

For most of us, our first introduction to maps was by a teacher at primary school. As we progressed through the education system, atlases were introduced, exposing students to the art of cartography and the science of geography. For those of us lucky enough to have an atlas in our home library we may have had an earlier exposure. With the development of the World Wide Web and smart devices, the way we consume geographic information has changed. So, have we seen the death of the Atlas?

Fascinating but worrying to see the work reported in The Age Newspaper ("Great Ocean Road at risk from surging sea” 11/01/2019 – Royce Millar) concerning the impact of rising sea levels on the iconic Great Ocean Road along the south-western Victorian coastline.  The article indicates that there are great concerns of continued sea level rise and erosion impacts washing away major sections of the Great Ocean Road in and around the Apollo Bay region.

Collisions with ships are one of the most common causes of death or injury for cetaceans.  The likelihood of collisions occurring will increase as the world’s reliance on ship-based transportation of goods and people increases.  Over 180,000 vessels are on the water at any given point in time (the ones that are complying with reporting regulations) according to the marine traffic web site.

I had the pleasure of attending the inaugural UN World Geospatial Information Congress earlier in November, along with new SV staff member, Zaffar Mohamed-Ghouse. I was there as a representative of both Spatial Vision and in my capacity of a Director of SIBA|GITA.  Zaffar likewise was representing SV’s new Strategic Consulting area, and in his capacity as a President of SSSI.

At Spatial Vision, we adopted an agile approach to the design and delivery of client projects many years ago. The sprint cycle provides regular opportunities to assess the direction of a project throughout the development lifecycle. We find this approach increases customer satisfaction as they see rapid, continuous delivery of demonstrable outputs. Furthermore, customers, developers and testers constantly interact enabling better collaboration and continuous attention to technical excellence and good design. 

As a certified GIS professional I am often asked what the letters “GISP” refer to at the end of my title.  My explanation is usually along the lines of “It means I am a certified professional, in my case a Geospatial Information System Professional” and “It also means I am accredited by an independent third-party certification body based in the US but recognised globally.”  But the response I receive back can be varied, as they seem somewhat confused as they enquire; but what does that mean and why is it important? 

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